Adams County History

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Allen County History

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Carroll County History

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Carroll County was formed in 1828 and named for signer of the Declaration of Independence, Charles Carroll. This region was originally noted for its forests and waterways, Wabash River, Tippecanoe River, and Wildcat Creek. Until the 1820s, Cass County was home to a French fur trading post located north of the town of Rockfield. Today, the county's main industry is agriculture.

Carroll County Historical Society
Po Box 277
Delphi , In 46923
Phone: 765/564-3152
Fax: 765/564-4851
Contact: Phyllis Moore
President: Lawrence Van Der Volgen

Cass County History

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Carroll County was formed in 1828 and named for signer of the Declaration of Independence, Charles Carroll. This region was originally noted for its forests and waterways, Wabash River, Tippecanoe River, and Wildcat Creek. Until the 1820s, Cass County was home to a French fur trading post located north of the town of Rockfield. Today, the county's main industry is agriculture.Cass County was established in 1828 and named for Governor and Brigadier General Lewis Cass of Michigan. Cass was responsible for negotiating the treaty with the Indians for incorporating the Cass County region into the United States in 1826. Cass County relies on local agriculture with about 85 percent of the county's acreage being employed as farmland.

Cass County Historical Society Inc.
1004 East Market Street
Logansport, In 46947
Phone: 219/753-3866
Contact: Bruce & Mary Stuart
President: David Kitchell

Fountain County History

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Fountain County was created December 30th 1825 with the Act of the Legislature of the State of Indiana. The Act read:

"An Act for the formation of a new county out of the counties of Montgomery and Wabash.
Sec. I. Be it enacted by the General Assembly of Indiana that from and after the first day of April, next, all that tract of country included within the constitute a new county, to be known and designated by the name of the County of Fountain, to-wit: Beginning where the line dividing townships 17 and 18 crosses the channel of the Wabash river; thence east to the line west of the second principle meridian; thence north to where said line strikes thence running down twith the meanderlings of said river to the place of beginning."

It has been said that Fountain county was named so because of the numerous fountains of pure water which flow along the hiss and terraces of the Wabash River and its tributaries. Another legend has it that the county was named for a Major Fountaine, who lived in the county at one time.


Fountain County Historical Society Inc.
C/O 724 South Layton Station Rd.
Veedersburg, IN 47987
Phone: 765/294-2037
President: Claudine Yerkes

Gibson County History

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Huntington County History

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Jay County History

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Knox County History

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Miami County History

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Parke County History

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Parke County Historical Society Inc.
PO Box 332
Rockville, IN 47872
Phone: 765/569-2223
President: Jim Meece

Posey County History

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Sullivan County History

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Tippecanoe County History

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In the early morning of Noverber 7, 1811, a force of 600-700 Indians made up of a confederation of the Potawatomi, Shawnee, Kickapoo, Delaware, Winnebago, Wea, and Wyandotte tribes under the direction of Tenskwatawa, the Shawnee Prophet, attacked an encampment of more than 900 United States regulars, militia, and volunteers under the command of territorial governor, William Henry Harrison. Even though the majority of the United States toops had no combat experience, the troops repelled the Indians. This battle resuled in the loss of the Prophet's power within the Indian territory. This was to be the first major conflict between the Indians and the white men in the region since 1794. This fighting brought about General william Henry Harrison's infamous campaign slogan, "Tippecanoe and Tyler Too."


Tippecanoe County Historical Association
909 South Street
Lafayette , In 47901
Phone: 765/742-8411
Fax: 765/742-1851
Contact: Phil Kwiatkowski
President: Jim Turley
Monon Railroad Historical -Technical Society
PO Box 5303
Lafayette , In 47903-5303
President: John R. Schneider
Shelby Township Historical Association
7537 W Us 52
West Lafayette , In 47906
Phone: 765/583-2165
President: James Howell
Shawnee Historical Association
5501 E 200 N
Lafayette , In 47905
Phone: 765/589-8049

Vermillion County History

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The name, "Vermillion," has a history that dates to the time of the Miami Indians. They named the red earth along the banks of today's Little and Big Vermillion River, "pe-auk-e-shaw." It is thought that the Indians located this earth while burning brush and weeds. This fire burned the shale which surfaced a coal and produced the red color. Translated in French, "pe-auk-e-shaw," means Vermillion, a color of red not as bright as scarlet. In 1824, Vermillion County became Indiana's 51st county. This county is bounded on the east by the Wabash River and on the west by the Illinois State line. Known as the long, skinny county, Vermillion County is seven miles wide by 37 miles long.

Vermillion County Historical Society
220 E Market Street
Box 273
Newport, IN 47966
President: Diann C. McIntosh

Vigo County History

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Vigo County Historical Society
Historical Museum Of The Wabash Valley
1411 South Sixth Street
Terre Haute, IN 47802
Phone: 812/235-9717
E-mail: MHagan@iquest.net
Contact: Marylee Hagan
President: Peter Sacopulos

Wabash County History

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Warren County History

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Warren County Historical Society
PO Box 176
Williamsport, IN 47993
President: Beulah M. Summers

Wells County History

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Adams County Heritage

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Allen County Heritage

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Carroll County Heritage

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Adams Mill

Powered by the waters of Wildcat Creek, was built in 1845 by John Adams. The mill is a prime example of post and beam construction common to 19th century agricultural structures in Indiana. No nails were used in the original framework, only wooden pegs. Posts and beams are made of walnut and the joists are of oak. The mill is a museum of Americana open to the public for tours on weekends and by special arrangement.

Wabash and Erie Canal Center

Guests can get a glimpse of life in the 1850s canal era and learn about the land, water and wildlife in early Indiana. Take a ride on a canal boat, visit the interpretive museum or walk the trails along a lovely stretch of the historic canal, once part of the largest manmade waterway in the United States.

Vanscoy Towpath Trail

This trail passes by the 1838-39 Irish Canal Construction Camp, and two prosperous paper mills operating in the mid 1800's. The southern most point of the trail is known as "Sunset Point" where Deer Creek meets the Wabash River.

Delphi Historic Trails

Check out this site to get a detailed map of the historic trails in Delphi.

Cass County Heritage

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Riverside Park - Dentzel Carousel

Logansport, Indiana is home to one of the oldest merry-go-rounds in the state of Indiana. The carousel is over 100 years old and is one of only two all-wood, hand-carved marry-go-rounds still in good working condition. The carousel was made by Gustav A. Dentzel, a German craftsman, who became the United States main carousel maker after moving here in 1860. The merry-go-round is located in Riverside City Park just off the Eel River.

France Park

Another great place to visit in Cass County is France Park, a spring fed limestone quarry surrounded by rocky bluffs that offers a plethora of recreational activities. This 520-acre park offers scuba diving, a beach for swimming, fishing, and 13 multi-use trails, accessible from five trailheads. The interconnected trails are for walking, mountain biking, and cross-country skiing. Winter activities include ice fishing and skating. Other natural features include the Paw Paw Creek waterfall, a Prairie Observation Tower, and a segment of what was once the Wabash & Erie Canal. For further information on the park, visit their website at www.francepark.com or call 574-753-2928.

Fountain County Heritage

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Fountain county is home to one of Indiana's few National Natural Landmarks. Caused by the meandering of a small stream, a 30-by-12-foot opening has been carved in a massive sandstone formation and created a bridge known as Portland Arch. Nearby, the Canada Blueberry can be found in the only known site in the state of Indiana. The Portland Arch State Nature Preserve is located on the south side of the town of Fountain. For more information you can contact the Department of Natural Resources, Division of Nature Preserves.


Gibson County Heritage

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Huntington County Heritage

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Jay County Heritage

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Knox County Heritage

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Miami County Heritage

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Parke County Heritage

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Parke County is known as the Covered Bridge Capital and hosts a huge festival each fall to celebrate these historic structures. The county has 31 covered bridges that can be toured any time of the year. Contact the Parke County Convention & Visitors Bureau at 765-569-5226 for more information about the bridges, the area and the many festivals and events that are celebrated year-round in the county. You may also visit their website, www.coveredbridges.com for more information

Posey County Heritage

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Sullivan County Heritage

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Tippecanoe County Heritage

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The Wabash River has played a major role in the development of this area. The land along the Wabash River in Tippecanoe County was first settled by Native Americans. The French arrived via the Wabash River in the early 1700s and established a trading post at Ouiatenon. The Feast of the Hunters' Moon is an annual celebration that recreates life in the mid-1700s at Fort Ouiatenon. In the early 1800s, a Native American community consisting of several tribes was established near the river and known as Prophetstown. This eventually led to the Battle of Tippecanoe in 1811. Prophetstown was destroyed and soon many settlers began moving in to the area. One can learn more about the events leading up to the battle in 1811 as well as see the battle field at the Tippecanoe Battlefield Museum and grounds. The annual Indiana Fiddlers Gathering takes place on the grounds as well. Contact the Tippecanoe County Historical Association for more information on Fort Ouiatenon and the battlefield at 765-476-8411.

The town of Battle Ground is also home to Wolf Park, Indiana's Unique Education and Research Wildlife Park. The park features multiple packs of gray wolves, a herd of bison, red foxes and a coyote. Visitors can learn about wolves and the unique social structure of these predators as well as about their role in the wild. Visit www.wolfpark.org or call 765-567-2265 for more information about the park.

Lastly, come visit historic downtown Lafayette. Enjoy the unique shops and restaurants on Main Street. Take a walk along the river on the Wabash River Heritage Trail. Visit Purdue University and experience the hustle and bustle of campus life or choose to slow down and enjoy life by camping at Wolfe's Leisure Time Campground. Contact the Greater Lafayette Convention and Visitor's Bureau at 800-872-6648 for more information on the community or visit these web sites:

Greater Lafayette Convention & Visitors Bureau
Tippecanoe County Historical Association





Vermillion County Heritage

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The Ernie Pyle State Historic Site features state-of-the-art exhibits based on World War II Correspondent Ernie Pyle's newspaper columns. The exhibits include video and audio stations and WW II uniforms, weapons and gear. The site also interprets the 1851 house from the farm where Ernie was born. Turkey Run State Park and Raccoon State Recreation Area and the covered bridges of Parke County are nearby this state historic house. The Ernie Pyle State Historic Site is located in Dana. You can call 765-665-3633 for more information.

Vigo County Heritage

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Terre Haute, In is the location of Indiana State University which was put on the map by basketball legend, and current Indiana Pacers coach, Larry Bird. Terre Haute was chosen to be the home of the Larry Bird Boston Connection as well as a hotel which displays most of his high school and NBA trophies and memorabilia.

Fowler Park Pioneer Village

located in Terre Haute, is a village constructed in the 1840's era. The park is complete with 10 log homes, shops, a smokehouse, barn, church and grist mill. During the annual Pioneer Days at the park, visitors can watch pioneers in costumes demonstrate the crafts of the era-spinning, rail splitting, candle making, carpentry and soap making. The festival takes place the first full weekend in October. The Fowler Park Pioneer Village is open most weekends from Memorial Day through Labor Day and admission is free. Also check out http://www.terre-haute.com/

Wabash County Heritage

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Warren County Heritage

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Standing atop Lovers Leap, overlooking Pine Crek, gives you one the most breathtaking views in the county. There is a legend of a beautiful Indian maiden who leaped to her death over a lover's quarrel.

Wells County Heritage

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